What is every country's representative folk song?
#21
Yup. We’re all related!
I played in a band in the 70s that opened many shows for the Average White Band. They sang like Stevie Wonder on stage, then when we talked backstage, their accents were full Glaswegian and we could barely understand them!
Bugari “Blue 72”, Tiger Combo ‘Cordeon, Iorio Concert Accorgan G Series (electronics removed)
Reply
#22
(16-04-2019, 08:03 PM)Eddy Yates Wrote: Yup. We’re all related!
I played in a band in the 70s that opened many shows for the Average White Band. They sang like Stevie Wonder on stage, then when we talked backstage, their accents were full Glaswegian and we could barely understand them!

Eddy,

My first wife loved the AWB and I saw them in Edinburgh about 40 years ago. They were credited as being from Dundee, but I believe there were one or two Glaswegians in the line up. Wasn't really my style, but they were good at what they did. 

As far as I can remember the Beatles took a while to convert to American accents. In the UK we were more used to people from Liverpool saying things like "Dhey don't do dhat down dhere dhough do dhey?" highlighting that people from the south of England were of a different culture. If you took the letter "d" out of the English alphabet, people from Merseyside would need to learn sign language. 

There were exceptions to Europeans singing in American accents. A culture existed for a time when performers sang in London cockney accents, such as here. Urban London folk music :-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gwu0Wde_Wm0

Surely the accent between Scotland and England doesn't just change at the border? No, it doesn't and some Scots have English sounding accents, with the reverse also being the case. A lot of local people here in the Scottish Borders support the nearby English soccer team, Newcastle United. 

Here is the Geordie "anthem" from Newcastle upon Tyne, which contains a lot of dialect words shared with us here on the "utha side o' the waal" (north side of the Roman Hadrian's Wall). Geordies consider themselves to be neither Scots nor English, but a race apart. Our UK postal code in this area straddles both sides of the border, and if it wasn't for the line somebody drew on a map you often couldn't tell whether you were in Scotland or England (for the time being). Some people in Edinburgh want to replace that line on the map with what could effectively be another wall, and they don't even have comb-over haircuts!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PrMaVjH...Tq&index=2
Reply
#23
Phil,

In my quest for "the" one folk tune from any particular country, I asked some Portuguese people I know if they could tell me what was their choice.

Straight away a debate took place with regard to various regions, then it changed to favourite performers, then there was a generation divide etc, etc.

Basically, they never came up with any specific answer, so I looked it up. Best I got was a list of the 7 most popular Portuguese folk tunes, and if they couldn't tell me which was the most representative then I wouldn't even try and hazard a guess.

In that place called Europe (just across the water from us), I managed to find a Belgian keyboard player playing one of Portugal's top 7 folk tunes. There were Portuguese versions, but IMHO this was the most easy listening version I could find.

Is it really representative of Portuguese folk music? Sounds like it is in Belgium!

Here is "Coimbra", sometime known as "April in Portugal". Check out the Belgian basses at his left hand.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lgTStA0uqE
Reply
#24
Hi John,

Nice tune! It sounds very familiar, though I can't put my finger on where or when I have heard it before.

Kind Regards, Old Scout.

Stephen.
Reply
#25
(17-04-2019, 11:59 PM)Stephen Hawkins Wrote: Hi John,

Nice tune!  It sounds very familiar, though I can't put my finger on where or when I have heard it before.

Kind Regards, Old Scout.

Stephen.

Stephen,

The usual rendition in Portugal is a very emotional tear jerker, in the Fado folk tradition under the title "Coimbra", after the town of the same name, and would hardly be described as easy listening.

It has been taken on board and jazzed up as an instrumental, such as here, and the title is then usually "April in Portugal." It was relatively popular in the years before Christ left Dumbarton, but you'll seldom hear it these days. 

Here it is in a sort of halfway house rendition with Portuguese guitars and bandolim (mandolin), then orchestration with the violins weeping instead of a singer. I see they've also referred to it as "Whispering Serenade" in this clip. It's a nice tune to play on the accordion, but can be difficult to get the timing just right. I used to work with a guy named Paolo de Carvalho from Coimbra, and he sometimes would have a go at singing it. He shared his name with a famous Portuguese singer, and I would sometimes accompany him on the guitar. We could have achieved international fame with the tune, but the bus company wouldn't give us the time off to go on a world tour! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNi6tg1m3rE  

I love Portugal, but the beer is pretty dire. Never been to Coimbra but the footage suggests I've missed out. We usually end up in the mountains in the Algarve or deep in the Alentejo, well away from the tourist trail. Any place with more than 500 people is a city to us. Only hassle I've ever had was when we went there the first time I set my watch to Spanish time and wondered why the shops never opened until 1000 in the morning! 

Better start talking about accordions soon, so here is my favourite Portuguese tune again, (by a Spanish player):-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfWaX6EVP9Y
Reply
#26
For the Czech Republic, it's fairly easy... Skoda Lasky otherwise known as Beer Barrel Polka... but for Canada?  I am stumped there... funny isn't it?    Huh  

Canada is such a vast mix of all nationalities that somehow, when talking about music, I think that they musically lost themselves!  Big Grin
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
Reply
#27
Hi John,

Thank you for that. I have definitely heard it before, but I know not where.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
Reply
#28
(Yesterday, 09:14 PM)JerryPH Wrote: For the Czech Republic, it's fairly easy... Skoda Lasky otherwise known as Beer Barrel Polka... but for Canada?  I am stumped there... funny isn't it?    Huh  

Canada is such a vast mix of all nationalities that somehow, when talking about music, I think that they musically lost themselves!  Big Grin

In Scotland they keep reminding us that the Faroe Islands are our nearest foreign holiday destination. 

The weather is usually much the same as ours, but the music is quite different. 

Rather than try and describe it, probably best just to listen. 

A long clip but IMHO worth it for the scenery, unusual instrumentals, and the incredible vocals. The singer, Eivør, is the most popular contemporary Faroese artiste. She often sings to the accompaniment of just a drumbeat. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zm3wa2LtJQM

Føroyskt, the Faroese language, is closely related to Icelandic.
Reply
#29
Well I've never lived in Canada, but I've lived in Minnesota. They tell me I was born there, but I really don't remember.

How about "Four Strong Winds" eh?
Reply


Forum Jump: