N Korean accordion factory video on YT
#21
I don't know, John. Most musicians I know try to get the best combination of sound, playability, and reliability at the price they can afford. They are smart enough to realize the difference, and do the research to get there. They realize that a good sounding, easiest playing instrument is way more fun to play, and consequently inspires them to improve as a musician. The cheap, flimsy guitar, flute, violin, accordion, whatever doesn't last long and the quick upgrade, or, if lucky enough, the first decent instrument often will make the difference between quitting and success.
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#22
Agree, you get the best of what you can afford.

I've met pro's (concert players) who invest in an instrument for life, huge cost at first, but if you write that off over years it's very cheap. Sometimes they are sponsored.

Another guy who bought my Concerto a while back was more of a regional pro (music teacher, workshops, small venues etc.) and he was perfectly happy with it. But those guys don't get paid a lot.

And here I am, not a pro but upgrading to my Bugari, sort of "unnecessary".
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#23
(14-05-2019, 04:36 AM)Tom Wrote: I don't know, John.  Most musicians I know try to get the best combination of sound, playability, and reliability at the price they can afford.  They are smart enough to realize the difference, and do the research to get there.  They realize that a good sounding, easiest playing instrument is way more fun to play, and consequently inspires them to improve as a musician.   The cheap, flimsy guitar, flute, violin, accordion, whatever doesn't last long and the quick upgrade, or, if lucky enough, the first decent instrument often will make the difference between quitting and success.

Very well said! You have to consider your goals as well as the cost of the instrument. Not being a pro I cannot see myself spending 25.000 to 30.000 euro on a new top of the line Italian accordion, even though theoretically I could perhaps afford it (at the expense of other nice things in life). I have several less expensive accordions and each of them give me pleasure for their different properties, and the most expensive ones I do have will probably become too large and heavy as I get older. A good example of why the most expensive and new examples are not needed is the dutch accordion duo Melancolique: https://www.acmel.nl/am/accordion/ame.htm who play very nicely (nothing difficult) and they do not use expensive new accordions and still sound great.
Reliability is an often overlooked property as well. For accompanying songs in public for instance it is hard to beat an old Hohner Verdi II N. The reeds are simple machine reeds that may use quite a bit of air but they never fail to play because of dust particles. Simple mechanics, and absolutely 100% reliable. A bayan on the other hand has very tight tolerances and a (high) reed may block or temporarily go out of tune due to dust particles (happened to me just last Saturday) or a convertor mechanism on an expensive Italian accordion may jam when it's not exactly in the on or off position... Once I was at a concert of Kurylenko whose (then) brand new Jupiter bayan jammed with a pallet stuck open deep in the cassotto...
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#24
Thanks Jozz and Paul. Yup, I've already bought the stand and 72 bass replacement due to weight issues. Smile I think the sound of the Melancolique accordion suits the style very well.
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