Recommendations for a talented child
#21
If classical music is the main interest, why not just carry on with the piano?
If the accordion, then there’s plenty of music to be had whatever the instrument and a lot of joy/music to be had with Stradella bass.
PA or CBA? I hear of PA players switching/wishing they had switched to Buttons – not so much the other way.
C-system is likely (in the UK /W. Europe?), to offer the widest choice of instruments/learning materials. The compact instrument/keyboard is a plus for a youngster
(Although clearly not ideal, I’ve heard of learners going to PA teachers as they have more in common than not. See also on-line.)
Freebass - not as a starter but, that said, I went down the Weltmeister route (see above) out of curiosity – cost effective and I enjoyed it. Mirror image/minor 3rd has a big advantage if you  play C-system CBA. 
I don’t see why you’d need a ‘method’ for Freebass unless you played PA. Incidentally Hohner were aiming to make the accordion more respectable by the 30s with MIII keyboard material. The ‘Big MIII Book’ has been around for years and has a huge choice of music. Once you know how it works then surely most sheet music will do.
48 Bass means either limiting the keys covered or the chords on offer and are generally f lower quality. 72 bass (especially 3+3 which gives easier minor thirds, a complete bass octave and a dim chord solution) is still compact on a CBA. There are limitations with a 72 bass but would that really matter to a beginner? More than 72 – hard to see why.
Finally, do you really mean ‘classical’ or is that a way of saying ‘more demanding/arranged/written music? If so, modern players (eg Petri Makkonen) produce challenging stuff and blend both Stradella and Freebass.
Anecdote: My son was keen on playing cello for four years. Then, suddenly he was not. Fortunately there was a ready market for a used cello.

If classical music is the main interest, why not just carry on with the piano?
If the accordion, then there’s plenty of music to be had whatever the instrument and a lot of joy/music to be had with Stradella bass.
PA or CBA? I hear of PA players switching/wishing they had switched to Buttons – not so much the other way.
C-system is likely (in the UK /W. Europe?), to offer the widest choice of instruments/learning materials. The compact instrument/keyboard is a plus for a youngster
(Although clearly not ideal, I’ve heard of learners going to PA teachers as they have more in common than not. See also on-line.)
Freebass - not as a starter but, that said, I went down the Weltmeister route (see above) out of curiosity – cost effective and I enjoyed it. Mirror image/minor 3rd has a big advantage if you  play C-system CBA. 
I don’t see why you’d need a ‘method’ for Freebass unless you played PA. Incidentally Hohner were aiming to make the accordion more respectable by the 30s with MIII keyboard material. The ‘Big MIII Book’ has been around for years and has a huge choice of music. Once you know how it works then surely most sheet music will do.
48 Bass means either limiting the keys covered or the chords on offer and are generally f lower quality. 72 bass (especially 3+3 which gives easier minor thirds, a complete bass octave and a dim chord solution) is still compact on a CBA. There are limitations with a 72 bass but would that really matter to a beginner? More than 72 – hard to see why.
Finally, do you really mean ‘classical’ or is that a way of saying ‘more demanding/arranged/written music? If so, modern players (eg Petri Makkonen) produce challenging stuff and blend both Stradella and Freebass.
Anecdote: My son was keen on playing cello for four years. Then, suddenly he was not. Fortunately there was a ready market for a used cello.

If classical music is the main interest, why not just carry on with the piano?
If the accordion, then there’s plenty of music to be had whatever the instrument and a lot of joy/music to be had with Stradella bass.
PA or CBA? I hear of PA players switching/wishing they had switched to Buttons – not so much the other way.
C-system is likely (in the UK /W. Europe?), to offer the widest choice of instruments/learning materials. The compact instrument/keyboard is a plus for a youngster
(Although clearly not ideal, I’ve heard of learners going to PA teachers as they have more in common than not. See also on-line.)
Freebass - not as a starter but, that said, I went down the Weltmeister route (see above) out of curiosity – cost effective and I enjoyed it. Mirror image/minor 3rd has a big advantage if you  play C-system CBA. 
I don’t see why you’d need a ‘method’ for Freebass unless you played PA. Incidentally Hohner were aiming to make the accordion more respectable by the 30s with MIII keyboard material. The ‘Big MIII Book’ has been around for years and has a huge choice of music. Once you know how it works then surely most sheet music will do.
48 Bass means either limiting the keys covered or the chords on offer and are generally f lower quality. 72 bass (especially 3+3 which gives easier minor thirds, a complete bass octave and a dim chord solution) is still compact on a CBA. There are limitations with a 72 bass but would that really matter to a beginner? More than 72 – hard to see why.
Finally, do you really mean ‘classical’ or is that a way of saying ‘more demanding/arranged/written music? If so, modern players (eg Petri Makkonen) produce challenging stuff and blend both Stradella and Freebass.
Anecdote: My son was keen on playing cello for four years. Then, suddenly he was not. Fortunately there was a ready market for a used cello.
Richard
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