HOHNER ARIETTA I M / CONCERTO II
#1
   

Hi to all,

I have recently purchased my first piano accordion and I'm curious as to when it was made. I hope someone here may be able to help me. I have contacted Hohner in Germany and have been given some interesting information but not the year of manufacture.

It is labelled Arietta I M in gold lettering on the casing. It has a four digit serial number with one digit not clearly stamped. It is either   1  318   or more likely   1  818.

Hohner have told me that the Arietta I M was produced between 1954 and 1956 and that it had different design features. Therefore, it is a Concerto II made at Trossingen between 1962 and 1980 and renamed Arietta I M to be exported by their Swiss subsidiary Akkordina in CH-Altstatten, as the four digit number relates to that company. Hohner do not have any records of those serial numbers.

However, according to the Hohner list of accordions available on this forum, the Arietta I M was made between1953 and 1957 and the Concerto II between 1956 and 1980. I have seen photos of instruments with at least four different designs that are identical but labelled either Arietta I M or Concerto II.

There is another number, engraved rather than stamped, on the back of the bass end, along the edge next to the bellows. It is   C P 5 0 8 4 7 8 6 3 3. Hohner said it is unknown to them.

So, does anyone have any idea as to where my instrument sits in the construction timeline? If someone has one with the same grille design and a Hohner serial number that would be very helpful. Any thoughts about the engraved number would be welcome.

Kind regards, Ian.
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#2
Hi Ian,

My Arietta MIV was produced from 1952. It is a 120/41, so just a bigger version of your instrument.

Hohner contracted a lot of their production to other makers, particularly in Switzerland and the former Czechoslovakia.

The Arietta is fairly "bomb proof", so it should do alright for you.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
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#3
Hi Stephen,

Thanks for your reply. 

According to Hohner, my instrument was actually made at their factory in Germany where it was stamped with the four digit serial number before being passed to the Swiss subsidiary who exported it, presumably to the UK.

Whilst it would be nice to know the period in which it was made, unless someone has an
identical instrument with a serial number on Hohner's database that they can tell me about, I probably never will. However, that really doesn't matter as I am absolutely delighted with it.

Kind regards, Ian.
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#4
Hi Ian,

All that really matters is that you are happy with your instrument. It doesn't really matter what it looks like or how old it is, just as long as you get pleasure from playing it.

I am from a "Folk" background, so never really trouble myself with matters which I view as "incidental." In my World, the most important thing by far is a willingness to share your music with like-minded people.

Members of my folk club are not "precious" about music, and anyone who wants to share their music with us is welcome to do so. We leave the purists to do their own thing, while we concentrate on having fun.

I have not been posting very much for the last week, as my wife has had a mild stroke. Her health, happiness and welfare is my primary concern at the moment, but I will visit the forum as often as I am able.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.
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#5
Hi Stephen 

My regards to your wife and hope she makes a full recovery.
Cordially, Tony
Artisto, Italian, LMM, 41/120, PA
Warning: Only speaks/understands American English
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#6
Hi Stephen,

I wish your wife a full and speedy recovery.

As I'd mentioned, I am really delighted with my Arietta and I'm enjoying working through the Sedlon books. Now that I've got both hands working together, I'm having a go at some of the tunes I already play on my other instruments.

It would be fair to consider me a 'purist' to some extent, as I have an interest in the various historical aspects of the music I make. However, it is in no way dry or dull, but full of vigour, lift, drive and very far from being precious. I am lucky to have like minded friends to share this with and we always have a great amount of fun. 

I don't belong to a folk club, but have performed at a few over the years. I used to regularly attend sessions and the one I started ran weekly for about fifteen years. With the 'band' that was the nucleus of that session, we played out for dances when requested. Now though, for a number of reasons, I mostly play at home but it is still all about having fun.

Kind regards, Ian.
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#7
Hi Tony,

Thank you for your kind words. I will be sure to pass on your best wishes to Brenda.

Kind Regards,

Stephen.

Hi Ian,

Thank you for your kind wishes, which I will be pleased to pass on to Brenda.

Though ours is a Folk Club, it would be more accurate to describe it as an Acoustic Club. Members can play any instrument they can drag through the door, just as long as it doesn't need to be plugged in.

Folk music accounts for about 60% of the music we play, but we have members with very diverse musical interests. One of our friends plays 14th 15th & 16th century Lute music, and he is very good. Another chap plays a Dulcimer, with mixed results.

Have Fun,

Stephen.
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#8
(09-07-2019, 01:15 PM)Stephen Hawkins Wrote: I have not been posting very much for the last week, as my wife has had a mild stroke.  Her health, happiness and welfare is my primary concern at the moment, but I will visit the forum as often as I am able.  

My prayers to you both that she makes a quick and full recovery.
___________________________________________________________

My musical memoires blog/website: http://www.AccordionMemories.com
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#9
Hi Jerry,

Thank you for your kind words. I will inform Brenda when she has finished her little snooze.

Kind Regards,

Stephen. (back to work now. dishes to be washed, etc.)
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