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#1
I stumbled onto this site when I was trying to find out how to overblow a Xaphoon ($1.99 at Goodwill), and there was Bruce Triggs! I am 80% through his book, "Accordion Revolution" and thoroughly enjoying it.
I play a Roland Fr-1x (piano keyboard) strictly for my own pleasure. My wife and I live in a smallish house and she has other things she would rather listen to, so the earbuds keep both of us happy. For my part I have few things I would rather listen to than potential accordion tunes to learn. I have 40s, 50s, 60s slower jazz standards on various thumb drives plus French cafe and polka tunes.
I began accordion lessons in 1956 when I was a lad of 10 in a suburb of Seattle. I had a good ear and faked the reading part of the lessons. Along came guitars and Folk and a high school rock band in the 60s and the accordion went into the closet. The 70s found me playing Gordon Lightfoot, the Byrds, Dylan, CSN&Y, on a 12-string to accompany my non-public vocals.
When I finally grew up I welcomed accordions back into  my life, eventually acquiring seven to repair and play. My favorite was the Hohner Verdi V, for the Continental voices.
I re-learned sight reading while practicing guitar for Scottish session tunes with Celtic Arts Foundation amateur musicians here in Mount Vernon, Washington. When I had had enough of bagpipe music I retreated back to the accordion.
My advice for a beginner: Practice those arpeggios.

Hi, Bruce.
Craig Carlile
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#2
Let me already say "Welcome to this accordion forum" !
I hope you'll enjoy the information and discussion on this forum.
Have a great time with your accordion(s)

"Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep which was lost!' I tell you that even so there will be more joy in heaven over one  GUITAR sinner who repents, than over ninety-nine righteous people who need no repentance."
— Luke 15:3-7

I play the accordion, my preferred musical instrument, and occasionally my guitar, concertina, harmonica.

I like to play renaissance and baroque lute/guitar pieces on my 6string guitar. With original or modern tablature.
Last week I picked up my guitar to try Flamenco pieces on my guitar. I have a Flamenco guitar method book from 1958 with tablature by Ivor Mairants ("A complete method for playing flamenco").
I'm fascinated by flamenco guitarists and dancers.

Grtz from an accordion and guitar amateur !
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#3
Welcome from another guitar player and starting accordionist. And, yes, I am practicing my arpeggios daily!
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#4
(05-09-2019, 03:50 PM)Stephen Wrote: Let me already say "Welcome to this accordion forum" !
I hope you'll enjoy the information and discussion on this forum.
Have a great time with your accordion(s)

"Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep which was lost!' I tell you that even so there will be more joy in heaven over one  GUITAR sinner who repents, than over ninety-nine righteous people who need no repentance."
— Luke 15:3-7

I play the accordion, my preferred musical instrument, and occasionally my guitar, concertina, harmonica.

I like to play renaissance and baroque lute/guitar pieces on my 6string guitar. With original or modern tablature.
Last week I picked up my guitar to try Flamenco pieces on my guitar. I have a Flamenco guitar method book from 1958 with tablature by Ivor Mairants ("A complete method for playing flamenco").
I'm fascinated by flamenco guitarists and dancers.

Grtz from an accordion and guitar amateur !



Thanks for the welcome, Stephen.
Looking back. I think I more often went astray due to my guitar playing rather than my accordion playing. But I doubt I will have earned any heavenly credits for either instrument. Flamenco guitar is beyond my ability, certainly.

This forum looks like it will be an endless source of information. I'm glad a chance search led me here.
Craig
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#5
Welcome from another ancient musical vagrant. I too have a copy of the Ivor Mairants flamenco book. I also have a proper flamenco guitar, which was bought by my father as a reward for getting into medical school in 1966. Needless to say my ambitions in flamenco were only partially, minimally, even, realised.

I am now about four months into learning the c-system CBA. Grinding out My Bonnie from the Palmer Hughes book one. Fortunately I live in a large detached house, so I don’t irritate the neighbours too much. My wife thankfully is fairly tolerant.
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#6
(05-09-2019, 06:58 PM)Chrisrayner Wrote: Welcome from another ancient musical vagrant.  I too have a copy of the Ivor Mairants flamenco book.  I also have a proper flamenco guitar, which was bought by my father as a reward for getting into medical school in 1966.  Needless to say my ambitions in flamenco were only partially, minimally, even, realised.

I am now about four months into learning the c-system CBA.  Grinding out My Bonnie from the Palmer Hughes book one.  Fortunately I live in a large detached house, so I don’t irritate the neighbours too much.  My wife thankfully is fairly tolerant.

Flamenco guitar and eventually accordion? Surely tango is on the horizon.We auld duffers are an eclectic lot.
Craig
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#7
Welcome Craig! Hope you enjoy your accordion journey!

I have somewhat the opposite story, having tried guitar earlier in life, picking it up again later, and starting accordion by random chance in middle age. Now I play both, although not simultaneously. I never practice arpeggios but I "should". I really enjoyed Accordion Revolution also. Tom
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#8
(06-09-2019, 02:52 PM)Tom Wrote: Welcome Craig!  Hope you enjoy your accordion journey!

I have somewhat the opposite story, having tried guitar earlier in life, picking it up again later, and starting accordion by random chance in middle age.  Now I play both, although not simultaneously.   I never practice arpeggios but I "should".  I really enjoyed Accordion Revolution also.  Tom

When my daughters come to visit they often ask if I am still playing my guitars. No one ever asks if I play my accordion. That illustrates the image society has of accordions and how guitars dominated popular culture. Accordion Revolution should be required reading in any music history class.
Craig
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#9
Wink 
That's the double strategy of the accordion+guitar playing male...
You quickly learn to adapt your fingering strategies  Wink

The accordion on a sunday afternoon, the guitar as a weapon a mass seduction friday and saturday night.

Flamenco picado and rasgueado to impress the women.
Cover up or hide your accordions when hot women come over for a visit !

Most of us male accordion players all have our emergency evacuation plans for our squeezeboxes.
Be careful when to pick the moment to "come out of the closet" with your squeezebox  Wink
You only have one chance, it can be a delicate operation
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#10
Fortunately, when you reach a "certain age" your accordion is more of a magnet than a guitar. So, no need to hide Stephen!
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#11
Wink 
(06-09-2019, 04:42 PM)Tom Wrote: Fortunately, when you reach  a "certain age" your accordion is more of a magnet than a guitar.  So, no need to hide Stephen!

Totally agree, I have some years to go to retirement, so you'll forgive me for using my "camouflage" techniques.
The used strategies depend on your audience or "targets".



In a way, an accordionist-guitarist can be a dirty rotten scoundrel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exqXoi878M4

to be with another woman zat is French, to get caught zat is American 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NePF08sMSDA
[color=var(--ytd-video-primary-info-renderer-title-color, var(--yt-spec-text-primary))]Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988) - Freddy Goes to Jail Scene (3/12) | Movieclips[/color]
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#12
(06-09-2019, 04:42 PM)Tom Wrote: Fortunately, when you reach  a "certain age" your accordion is more of a magnet than a guitar.  So, no need to hide Stephen!

Guitar: Chick Magnet
Accordion: Hen Magnet

Leftovers from  high school Logic class.
Craig
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#13
I think you're right, Craig. Haven't seen that particular movie, Stephen, but Seve Martin is pretty much always funny.
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#14
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is one of my favorite comedy movies. If you get a chance to watch it you'll have a good time. 
The chemistry between the actors is a success. 

I've had the same logic classes in high school and in pubs. 
It sounds furry logic.
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#15
(08-09-2019, 04:18 PM)Stephen Wrote: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is one of my favorite comedy movies. If you get a chance to watch it you'll have a good time. 
The chemistry between the actors is a success. 

I've had the same logic classes in high school and in pubs. 
It sounds furry logic.

In high school I strove to fill up the tank with logic, but somehow it seemed to drain out the longer I spent in pubs in college.

I told my TV to record DRS, which will be on some obscure cable channel at 04:00 tomorrow. We like to save them for the “indoor” weather that’s coming. Thanks for the recommendation.
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