CBA Beginner Books - Palmer Hughes?
#21
Does anyone have any good links to any posters or large charts for CBA ?
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#22
(07-11-2019, 12:11 AM)willclimbs Wrote: Does anyone have any good links to any posters or large charts for CBA ?

In this English document are some charts and pics of layouts for CBA :

http://www.lucapiovesan.it/wp-content/up...S-v1.0.pdf

A quote from page 13 of this document:

"It should be made clear that nowadays the majority (more than 90%) of classically trained accordionists plays the “button accordion”, and it has also been confirmed as the standard from the International Accordion Society (1993). The button accordion is superior in range, hand configuration, fingering, regularity of the progressions, and variety of combinations between the two hands. In my opinion the C-griff is a small step better than the B-griff, having a mirror-made disposition of the keys (which feels much more natural) and allowing a more natural adaptation of the hands."
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#23
(07-11-2019, 02:28 PM)Stephen Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 12:11 AM)willclimbs Wrote: Does anyone have any good links to any posters or large charts for CBA ?

In this English document are some charts and pics of layouts for CBA :

http://www.lucapiovesan.it/wp-content/up...S-v1.0.pdf

A quote from page 13 of this document:

"It should be made clear that nowadays the majority (more than 90%) of classically trained accordionists plays the “button accordion”, and it has also been confirmed as the standard from the International Accordion Society (1993). The button accordion is superior in range, hand configuration, fingering, regularity of the progressions, and variety of combinations between the two hands. In my opinion the C-griff is a small step better than the B-griff, having a mirror-made disposition of the keys (which feels much more natural) and allowing a more natural adaptation of the hands."

Coo!  That’s a very interesting document.  Thanks for the post.
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#24
Thank's for the post! Will print off those.

Also, should I pick up a metronome to practice alongside?
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#25
Willclimbs do you have a background in studying music? As a child perhaps? If you have had no background I think a metronome is good to start with,just to understand the basic beats. Unfortunately I don’t practise with a metronome although I always did when I studied other instruments. Purists will argue you must find the beat in yourself,but if you’ve never studied music that’s a challenge. Also depending on your background in music there are zillions of easy rhythm books you can buy. If you need to you can just sit at your desk and practise clapping beats with your book,your metronome and your hands. Music education is so massive,except sorry for the accordion,that there are a world of aids you can find out there. Also I would look into the new beautiful Halifax public library. You probably can get good rhythm books there,if need be.
One question-as a beginner what motivated you to go to the button accordion? It isn’t popular at all in North America but that’s ok. You will start a new trend!
Finally,until your instrument arrives-since you have starter books, a teacher told me recently that you don’t need the actual instrument to begin. Open the book,find the first position/passage and just work on your arm or on a table. It doesn’t help with the bellowing but does give you a head start on basic fingering.


For anyone interested,a good online site is Accordionsnews USA. There is a world-wide version but I stick to this one. It comes out first day of the new month and is packed with news about clubs,concerts,performances,history and reviews.

Finally-there are many great accordion festivals around the continent every year. The largest is the Las Vegas accordion convention which took place last month. In March is the Dallas accordion festival run by the national accordion association. I went once and it’s exceptional. There are workshops all day and fantastic performances at night. The American Accordion Association meets every July in a different city and the American association and guild of accordion teachers meets every August. These conventions all have very interesting web sites and the American Accordion..has a teachers directory. So there’s lots to look at on the web. Canada has either two or three summer festival but I’ve never been. Victoria has one every summer which sounds great and there is one in Quebec,perhaps near Quebec City. Not sure about that one.

Enjoy!

Can you tell I’m a total accordion nut?
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#26
Just download a free metronome app for our phone!  Good luck!
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#27
(08-11-2019, 03:42 AM)Alans Wrote: Willclimbs do you have a background in studying music? As a child perhaps? If you have had no background I think a metronome is good to start with,just to understand the basic beats. Unfortunately I don’t practise with a metronome although I always did when I studied other instruments. Purists will argue you must find the beat in yourself,but if you’ve never studied music that’s a challenge. Also depending on your background in music there are zillions of easy rhythm books you can buy. If you need to you can just sit at your desk and practise clapping beats with your book,your metronome and your hands. Music education is so massive,except sorry for the accordion,that there are a world of aids you can find out there. Also I would look into the new beautiful Halifax public library. You probably can get good rhythm books there,if need be.
One question-as a beginner what motivated you to go to the button accordion? It isn’t popular at all in North America but that’s ok. You will start a new trend!
Finally,until your instrument arrives-since you have starter books, a teacher told me recently that you don’t need the actual instrument to begin. Open the book,find the first position/passage and just work on your arm or on a table. It doesn’t help with the bellowing but does give you a head start on basic fingering.


For anyone interested,a good online site is Accordionsnews USA. There is a world-wide version but I stick to this one. It comes out first day of the new month and is packed with news about clubs,concerts,performances,history and reviews.

Finally-there are many great accordion festivals around the continent every year. The largest is the Las Vegas accordion convention which took place last month. In March is the Dallas accordion festival run by the national accordion association. I went once and it’s exceptional. There are workshops all day and fantastic performances at night. The American Accordion Association meets every July in a different city and the American association and guild of accordion teachers meets every August. These conventions all have very interesting web sites and the American Accordion..has a teachers directory. So there’s lots to look at on the web. Canada has either two or three summer festival but I’ve never been. Victoria has one every summer which sounds great and there is one in Quebec,perhaps near Quebec City. Not sure about that one.

Enjoy!

Can you tell I’m a total accordion nut?

I did play various instruments up until beginning high school. Clarinet, Saxophone & Stand up Bass. I feel that I do have a good feel for the timing/rhythm. I was just wondering if maybe a metronome was a standard suggestion when getting back into it. Maybe I'll use a phone app for a bit.

I wanted to go the accordion button route as I do not have a history playing piano, and I read that the buttons on the CBA allow for less hand/arm movement in order to access a wide variety of notes.
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#28
Playing at a consistent time is good. One friend of mine speeds up almost every song and it is annoying. Knowing whether you are consistent, and being in charge of your time changes is essential to maintaining a cheery relationship.
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#29
Will,

You said you bought some Palmer-Hughes "accessory" books?
Is one of them Adventures in Bassland? It's very good.
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#30
CBA beginners who can't follow live lessons sitting next to an accordion teacher, could also use some YT videos in combination with books/tutorials/methods.
It's in French, but Frédéric Deschamps and Hohner posted this 45 minutes video of an accordion class. He's a flamboyant personality and an internationally respected accordion teacher.

(the dark sunglasses are optional)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bniNJnIUgO4&t=2059s    

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2JEEaMzExE&t=208s


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSyO9Wy53l0&t=692s
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