In the market for something else
#41
(16-01-2020, 06:13 PM)maugein96 Wrote:
(16-01-2020, 05:36 PM)Tom Wrote: How did you find getting to Castelfidardo, Paul?  Did you fly to Ancona and rent a car?

Tom,

If I was going to buy an accordion I'd take the car from Birmingham, UK. 

1200 miles, 19 1/2 hours, no problem for a young guy like me. After 31st January it will still be 1200 miles, but could take 19 1/2 days to clear all the customs checks. 

Paul is about 300 miles closer than I am and about 5 hours quicker.

If I was going to Italy for any other reason then I'd fly (preferably in a reliable aeroplane).
I may be 300 miles closer, but I drive slowly and I do not drive to Castelfidardo in one go so in fact door to door takes me more than 19 1/2 hours... After January 31st the UK will still be in a customs union with the EU until a new deal is made, so no rush for an accordion purchase from Italy.
In any case, I would not fly to Ancona and then rent a car. I just drive all the way. When you only go 100 to 110 km/h yu do not get tired from driving, only from sitting in the car for a long time.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#42
Thanks guys! Looks like it would be plane and bus for me, unless I were elsewhere in Italy and renting a car. Someday!
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#43
(16-01-2020, 06:42 PM)Tom Wrote: Thanks guys!  Looks like it would be plane and bus for me, unless I were elsewhere in Italy and renting a car. Someday!

Tom,

Sorry I jumped in before Paul had a chance to answer. 

The point I was making is that most people in mainland Europe would drive through maybe two or three countries, much the same way as you would with states in the US. 

The UK has fairly comprehensive car ferries to various European countries for those who prefer to go at their own pace, and the fact that our cars are designed to be driven on the other side of the road is not so much of a problem once you get used to it. 

Some Italian trucks and buses still had right hand drive until fairly recently, so they could better see the edge of the highway on mountain roads. 

To summarise, if I was going to Italy for leisure I'd probably fly. To buy an accordion I'd take the car. I'd probably do two overnight stops each way, and that would add considerably to the cost of an accordion. It would need to be a top of the range job to justify that, as petrol (gas) over here is damned expensive as well. I would also need to be a top of the range player. Maybe in another life!

Checked car hire at Ancona airport. $15 per day with free snow chains included at this time of year. What are you waiting for?!
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#44
Hi John,

Thanks for the info! Luckily the shipping costs for my accordions was not too bad and although I took a big risk by buying without trying (and sending the fare upfront) I was super successful. I don't need to go to buy another instrument although it would be fun to visit and check out the Accordion Repair Academy too. I have visited Italy 3 times to vacation and visit friends and relatives but have not been to Le Marche or the east coast.
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#45
(17-01-2020, 01:46 PM)Tom Wrote: Hi John,

Thanks for the info!  Luckily the shipping costs for my accordions was not too bad and although I took a big risk by buying without trying (and sending the fare upfront) I was super successful. I don't need to go to buy another instrument although it would be fun to visit and check out the Accordion Repair Academy too.  I have visited Italy 3 times to vacation and visit friends and relatives but have not been to Le Marche or the east coast.

Hi Tom,

Last time I saw Italy was from the top of Biokovo mountain in Croatia, when we were lucky enough to be there on one of the rare days when it is clear enough to see Monte Gargano, 147 miles away across the Adriatic in Apulia. Just too far to swim with an accordion on your back.

Only time I've ever actually been to Italy was to Piemonte, and that was before any of my kids were born in the mid 80s. 

I would love to go to Monghidoro in Emilia Romagna, where they sometimes hold an open air accordion festival. It often gets snowed in at this time of year, but today it's a blistering 10c and there is no snow forecast until Tuesday.
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#46
Sounds like a fun time!
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#47
Not been here for a bit. Been rather busy .... err .... buying a new accordion.

Tbh, it's all Tom's fault for posting his Jambalaya video. I fell in love with the sound of his Piatanesi immediately, so when that ex demo model came up it was pretty much as good as sold. My bank has authorised and sent payment, so hopefully a done deal.

I guess there will be some of you tutting and shaking your heads because I haven't tried it, or any others. If it had been anything else, I wouldn't have bought untried. I already know the size and weight is going to be fine, love the look, colour and sound. If there is anything else that may trip me up, well I guess I'll learn the hard way and you'll be able to say I told you so.

You have all been incredibly generous in your help and suggestions, and despite how it may look, all have been taken on board and carefully considered. In fact I've not thought about much else since I started this thread. Sadly, going to fetch it just isn't an option right now, so it will be shipped - it's a risk I'll just have to take.

An extra thank you to Maugein for sending the link in the first place. I said early on in this thread that the most important thing for me is that I love playing it. I think I will.
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#48
(17-01-2020, 04:28 PM)Bella Wrote: Not been here for a bit. Been rather busy .... err .... buying a new accordion.

Tbh, it's all Tom's fault for posting his Jambalaya video. I fell in love with the sound of his Piatanesi immediately, so when that ex demo model came up it was pretty much as good as sold. My bank has authorised and sent payment, so hopefully a done deal.

I guess there will be some of you tutting and shaking your heads because I haven't tried it, or any others. If it had been anything else, I wouldn't have bought untried. I already know the size and weight is going to be fine, love the look, colour and sound. If there is anything else that may trip me up, well I guess I'll learn the hard way and you'll be able to say I told you so.

You have all been incredibly generous in your help and suggestions, and despite how it may look, all have been taken on board and carefully considered. In fact I've not thought about much else since I started this thread. Sadly, going to fetch it just isn't an option right now, so it will be shipped - it's a risk I'll just have to take.

An extra thank you to Maugein for sending the link in the first place. I said early on in this thread that the most important thing for me is that I love playing it. I think I will.
Well Bella,

Never thought you'd go for it, but a nearly new Italian box for €1800 would probably have swayed me as well if I had been in the market for one. Just waiting for my €200 commission (only kidding, it was €300)

The other members who dealt with the outlet were very satisfied with the service they received and I'm sure you'll get a lot of enjoyment out of your new Piatanesi (correct spelling this time).

You can spend a lot of time trying out accordions for weight and size etc, and maybe never get it absolutely right for you. However you've solved that problem now, so you'll need to learn how to tame it very soon. 

I've only ever bought one accordion online and said I'd never do it again. To be honest I was motivated by the savings I made by buying it in the USA rather than because I actually wanted the instrument. Your circumstances were different. You had seen and heard the instrument and wanted one like it, so why not? There is no substitute for play before you buy, but I once tried three identical accordions in a shop and couldn't make up my mind which one to go for. They all sounded slightly different, and I trusted the staff in the shop to advise me which one sounded best. 

They were all French Cavagnolos with three voice French musette tuning, but as the shop was in Scotland the staff reckoned the one with the strongest musette (most Scottish sounding) was the winner.


I bought it and several months later realised the musette tuning wasn't right for me. There was also a twist to the tale. 

I later discovered that the instrument I bought had a slight defect. It was a CBA and row 4 was too close to row 3 by a few mm. That made it difficult to play. There was also a bellows fault and the control rods on some of the bass buttons hadn't been manufactured properly. 

The moral is even if you go and try before you buy you can end up with a dud. 

Tom bought his without seeing it and is delighted with it. I'm sure it will work out the same for you. 

Almost forgot, did they explain why the demo model is not the same as the one they had for sale?
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#49
I did email (in English) and they sent me a link to a video of the correct instrument. That was actually the clincher. When I heard the Soprani, I was a tad disappointed and thought Oh, it doesn't sound quite as nice as I thought (still believing it to be the instrument for sale). Listened to the Piatanesi on the new link and fell in love all over again.
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#50
(17-01-2020, 06:27 PM)Bella Wrote: I did email (in English) and they sent me a link to a video of the correct instrument. That was actually the clincher. When I heard the Soprani, I was a tad disappointed and thought Oh, it doesn't sound quite as nice as I thought (still believing it to be the instrument for sale). Listened to the Piatanesi on the new link and fell in love all over again.

Hi Bella,

Thanks for explaining that. I wouldn't have known the difference between the two, as I'm not familiar with either. 

FWIW the facility to put more than one Piatanesi in the shopping basket was obviously a glitch on their website. There are now none listed, so it seems you got the only one right enough. 

I just decided to have a look on their site after reading your posts, as their prices for quality used and nearly new instruments are pretty keen. 

They have a couple of older used CBAs that I would have in a minute, but I promised the other half that four accordions would do me. We've not long relocated to the West Midlands from Scotlandshire and the house will take up any accordion cash for quite a while I fear.  

Shipping shouldn't take very long, about a week as far as I can remember. Hope there are no problems and you get many good years out of it.
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#51
(17-01-2020, 06:27 PM)Bella Wrote: I did email (in English) and they sent me a link to a video of the correct instrument. That was actually the clincher. When I heard the Soprani, I was a tad disappointed and thought Oh, it doesn't sound quite as nice as I thought (still believing it to be the instrument for sale). Listened to the Piatanesi on the new link and fell in love all over again.

Congratulations, I do hope you are pleased with your purchase once you get your hands on it.  It’s all about making music, not ownership of instruments.  Although in some corners of the Internet you might think otherwise.
Elderly teenager still experimenting with music of all descriptions.  I may not please anyone else, but I’m long past caring about that.
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#52
(17-01-2020, 05:50 PM)maugein96 Wrote: Just waiting for my €200 commission (only kidding, it was €300)

Hmm, don't know about that, but I do make very good fruit cake. You're West Midlands, I'm 20 miles over the border into Wales - practically next door neighbours!

Thank you Chris. Tbh I wouldn't have much clue about makes and names, which is why I started this thread in the first place. Having 'a name' matters not one jot to me. So long as it's the right thing for me, it can be the equivalent of a pair of Asda trainers. Having said that, I do seem to end up having expensive preferences!
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#53
(17-01-2020, 07:38 PM)Bella Wrote:
(17-01-2020, 05:50 PM)maugein96 Wrote: Just waiting for my €200 commission (only kidding, it was €300)

Hmm, don't know about that, but I do make very good fruit cake. You're West Midlands, I'm 20 miles over the border into Wales - practically next door neighbours!

Thank you Chris. Tbh I wouldn't have much clue about makes and names, which is why I started this thread in the first place. Having 'a name' matters not one jot to me. So long as it's the right thing for me, it can be the equivalent of a pair of Asda trainers. Having said that, I do seem to end up having expensive preferences!

I meant commission from my friend Luigi in Castelfidardo Wink

Hope he doesn't offer to pay me in pannetone!

Glad to have been of assistance, and enjoy it. 

A lot of us were image conscious when we were younger, and none of the big French musette stars played on no name accordions. I've had Guerrini, Fratelli Crosio, Cavagnolo, Marinucci, Hohner, Paolo Soprani, Ballone Burini, Hohner, Piermaria, and of course Maugein boxes, but I'm still a no name player. 

These days I couldn't care less what the name on the front is.
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#54
I just hope you're as delighted as I am Bella! Let us know when it comes and we will help you with any strap adjustments or any other setup you need.... I also had never heard of Piatanesi before I bought mine but since it was recommended by a player I respected greatly that was enough for me and I don't see any need at all to replace them now.
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