Bellows phrasing
#1
A flurry of socially distanced recording has revealed to me that my bellows technique is absolutely destroying my phrasing.
Anyone care to share their thoughts about proper bellows phrasing?
One approach would seem to be to try to reverse bellows in a predictable pattern, barring specific reasons to vary, such as accents or articulations. For example, reversing every 2 bars.

Also, is it generally the practice to accent using pushes as opposed to pulls?

Funny how different one’s playing sounds under the harsh light of recording.
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#2
What I use in my playing is making sence of the musical sentences contained in the piece. For example, when I play waltzes, they have a solid structure, lets say A-A1, B-B1, A-A1, C-C1, D-D1, for example. The difference between A and A1 and the others being only in the last notes (so they are practically the same, from the perspective of bellowс changing). My aim is to change the bellows where the dashes and the commas are. And the last thing I aim for is ending the piece with the bellows closed. Smile
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#3
(25-03-2020, 06:36 PM)mgavrilov Wrote: What I use in my playing is making sence of the musical sentences contained in the peace. For example, when I play waltzes, they have a solid structure, lets say A-A1, B-B1, A-A1, C-C1, D-D1, for example. The difference between A and A1 and the others being only in the last notes (so they are practically the same, from the perspective of bellowс changing). My aim is to change the bellows where the dashes and the commas are. And the last thing I aim for is ending the piece with the bellows closed. Smile

On bandoneon, ending the piece with bellows as open as possible is standard. End the piece with a peacock-like display of the beautiful bellows paper.   Wink
But yes, one important process seems to be to consciously identify direction change points and treat them as rigorously as any other note. Exactly the same as singing.
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#4
(25-03-2020, 04:27 PM)stickista Wrote: ... Funny how different one’s playing sounds under the harsh light of recording.

There is nothing like listening to a recording of one's self to understand what others hear. Time, patience, and endurance are the basic approaches to refining technique. Not only is the accordion one of the most difficult instruments to play, it is also one of the most difficult to record.
I want to play the accordion badly – and I do.
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#5
(25-03-2020, 07:13 PM)stickista Wrote: ...

On bandoneon, ending the piece with bellows as open as possible is standard. End the piece with a peacock-like display of the beautiful bellows paper.   Wink
But yes, one important process seems to be to consciously identify direction change points and treat them as rigorously as any other note. Exactly the same as singing.

On accordion, ending the piece with bellows closed is standard. It is especially common with Russian bayan players. It takes practice but when you manage the bellows carefully towards the end of a piece you can almost always end with the bellows closed.
Paul De Bra (not Debra...)
http://www.de-bra.nl
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#6
it's simply one of the basic topics to practice on a piece: RH, LH and bellows.

There is not really a fixed pattern that you can apply on everything. Also depends on how much air you have. Some may use it creatively.
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#7
(25-03-2020, 09:01 PM)fphlpsnrg Wrote:
(25-03-2020, 04:27 PM)stickista Wrote: ... Funny how different one’s playing sounds under the harsh light of recording.

There is nothing like listening to a recording of one's self to understand what others hear. Time, patience, and endurance are the basic approaches to refining technique. Not only is the accordion one of the most difficult instruments to play, it is also one of the most difficult to record.

I take it you've never played or recorded bagpipes then Rolleyes.
 Oh, sorry I guess you meant Musical instruments Huh
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